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Save Habitat and Diversity of Wetlands

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By shadowadmin on 4/28/2016 11:35 AM

May is Wildfire Awareness Month in King County. Join King County and SHADOW for an upcoming Firewise and Emergency Preparedness Workshop on Wednesday, May 4th! More info and registration.

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By shadowadmin on 4/13/2016 2:46 PM

Do you like working with children? Like frogs and caring for our natural environment? SHADOW is seeking a group of dedicated community members to help us successfully host our first-ever Save the Frogs Day Eco-Fest in partnership with Steamboat Studio and Woodland Park Zoo! Volunteers will assist with event set-up and breakdown, guest registration and hospitality, and facilitating hands-on educational activities and games. No teaching experience necessary, all materials and instruction will be provided. Past experience working with children desired. More information about Save the Frogs Day Eco-Fest can be found here: http://bit.ly/24DZYPG

Please contact Sahara at sahara@shadowhabitat.org or 425-432-4914 to learn more and sign up today!



By shadowadmin on 5/1/2013 10:47 AM

As the days grow long and the flowers begin to bloom SHADOW has begun to come alive. Frogs croak in the amphibian pond and the bright pink of salmon berry flowers can be seen throughout the bog and upland section. It is a magical time here in the bog!

By shadowadmin on 3/30/2013 1:45 PM

This is my first spring here at SHADOW as the Executive Director and I am excited to watch the land bloom from the bareness of winter to the brightness of spring. With the move towards warmer weather and sunnier skies we are looking forward to getting outside and exploring more and more of our bog and forests. Recently I have been walking our trails and noticing the signs of spring like the budding of the huckleberries and skunk cabbage. The animals are also starting to wake up which can be heard in the croaking of the frogs and singing of the birds here at SHADOW. Each day we are serenaded by the wonderful melodies of our wonderful wildlife.

I wanted to share some of the recent changes to SHADOW and upcoming opportunities with you. I am excited about the new opportunities coming up and know that this will be a wonderful year here!

By shadowadmin on 3/10/2013 12:05 PM
This is AmeriCorps appreciation week and we want to take a moment to say thank you to all of the AmeriCorps volunteers who are working to improve our communities. We espeacially want to thank our current AmeriCorps volunteer Darren and our previous volunteer Keerti for their wonderful work supporting the programs here at SHADOW.
By shadowadmin on 12/23/2012 9:39 AM

 Nature is truely the greatest gift that our planet has given us. Take a moment and think about all that the planet has given and the role that nature plays in your life.

By shadowadmin on 12/7/2012 9:44 AM
I am very excited to be the new executive director here at SHADOW. This is a really amazing place and I am looking forward to working with everyone to help increase our impact on our community and on wetland conservation.

A little about me

I have been extremely lucky in the fact that I was able to grow up in Seattle and experience all that our area has to offer. From infancy I spent time exploring deep green forests, clean white mountain slopes, and choppy gray water of Puget Sound. This time inspired a deep and lasting love of our lands here in the Pacific Northwest and an appreciation of the importance of these places.



My love of nature lead me to get my Masters in Global Environmental Policy from American University in Washington, DC. Through this program I deepened my understanding of the issues facing our environment today and the different approaches for environmental and economic...
By shadowadmin on 11/21/2012 2:23 PM
What does the term "Noxious Weed" even mean? It's the traditional term for invasive plants, plants that harm our ecosystems and growing habitats. The term also includes non-native plants that actually grow on a wide variety of lands including wetlands, lakes, streams, bogs etc. Here in Washington, we have a very vast and beautiful wildlife, but are you aware of what's lurking around your garden/yard? Here's a crazy thought, there are thousands of "Noxious Weeds" just in your back yard! These weeds are actually a big problem in our environment, costing farmers millions of dollars to try and prevent and control the rapid growth of the variety of species. About half of the noxious weeds growing in Washington are here from gardens, known as "escapees", which explains the mask of beauty that fools most of you gardeners or landscapers. They also came here on ships in packing material, or clinging to wheels and/or shoes of travelers.

Here is a little guide for all the main Noxious Weeds to look out for! Includes:...
By shadowadmin on 10/25/2012 8:30 AM
As costs are rising higher and higher these days, it is important to note that although we cannot easy influence the price of the things we pay for we do often have control over how much we use things.  Whether it is throwing another blanket on the bed and turning the heat down or getting better at managing your leftovers, every little bit can add up over a period of time.  Imagine taking one of your large monthly bills and removing a large portion of that.  Sustainable architecture is about applying this idea of conserving to the way we heat, cool, and light our homes.

Environmental architecture has come a long way in the past few years.  The processes of assembling and styles owners have to choose from have all increased a bit as more firms are seeing the interest in home owners to eliminate these large portions of their bills.  Remember that these projects do not all have to be done at once.  Sometimes there are small changes you can make to your home over time to reduce the cost of further expenses....
By shadowadmin on 5/16/2012 10:25 AM

"For most of human history, people chased things or were chased themselves. They turned dirt over and planted seeds and saplings. They took in Vitamin D from the sun, and learned to tell a crow from a raven (ravens are larger; crows have a more nasal call; so say the birders). And then, in less than a generation’s time, millions of people completely decoupled themselves from nature."

The New York Times,  

March 29, 2012, 

Nature-Deficit Disorder by Timothy Egan

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Re: Aldo Leopold
Iv read A Sand County Almanac by Leopold! Its definitely one worth checking out- he was a remarkable man. This screening sounds equally as interesting!